Current Issue
 

Your Thoughts

by Readers
  
From the July 2006 Signs  

I don’t want to be tested.
                     Let the other worlds be tested.

Satanís world

Why doesnít someone from your staff be bold and hazard a guess as to why God chose the earth in which to boot Lucifer. Something ainít fair. And Iím sure there are billions of humans who would agree. I donít want to be tested. Let the other worlds be tested.

Mike McInerney, email

Editor’s response: The Bible only tells us that Satan was cast into the earth. It doesnít tell us why. While itís OK to guess and speculate as to Godís reasons for casting Satan to the earth, we have no certainty from the Bible that our speculation is correct.

Haunting photograph

I wish you had never printed the picture with the article “Picture Lesson” that appeared on page 25 of the February 2006 Signs. Itís gut-wrenching and heartbreaking! To actually see that poor child dying in that manner was more than I could take. We know there are thousands more like her. The only comfort we have is knowing God was right there with that baby (and the rest of them too). Dear Jesus, please come soon!

Donna Mozzone, email

Thanks for Signs

I receive Signs thanks to loving friends. Even though I am Catholic, I have no spiritual conflicts with Signs. I enjoy every issue.

Robert H. Oldfield, Buckeye, Arizona

Misprint

Has there been a lost verse in the Bible that was recently found? In the April 2006 letters from readers you published a letter with the subhead, “Whose sons were Jesusí brothers?” In his response the editor said—and I quote, “Joseph and Mary did have sexual intercourse after the birth of Jesus (Matthew 2:25), so Jesusí brothers could have been Maryís sons.” Iíve checked and rechecked and do not find Matthew 2:25 in any of my Bibles. Iím certain this was a misprint but I am interested in knowing what proof text was intended.

Debra Lindsey, email

Editor’s response: Thank you for being a careful reader of Signs. We received a number of letters and emails calling our attention to this misprint. The correct reference is Matthew 1:25.

Who were Jesusí brothers?

Regarding your editorís response in the April 2006 Signs about whether the brothers of our Lord were sons of Mary, nothing in Scripture indicates that Mary had any other children. On the contrary, the attitude of His brothers implies that they were older than He (John 7:2–5). Also, at the cross Yeshua (Jesus) gave the care of His mother to John, the beloved disciple (John 19:25–27). This suggests that His brothers had no moral or legal obligation (according to the Jews) to care for her after His death. If they were Maryís sons, they would have been obliged. Thus, the brothers of Yeshua were older than He, stepbrothers, the sons of Joseph from a previous marriage.

M. Michael Pizar, Mountain City, Tennessee

Tempted in every way?

How could Jesus have been tempted “in every way, just as we are” (Hebrews 4:15) if He was never married?

Richard Dibell, Coldwater, Michigan

Editor’s response: There are many ways in which we experience temptations that Jesus did not. As a man, He did not experience the temptations that are unique to women. As a young person, He did not experience the temptations that are unique to old age. This statement means that Jesus experienced the temptations that are most basic to our human nature. John lists three: “The lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life” (1 John 2:16, KJV). Jesusí three temptations by the devil in the wilderness included temptations to mistrust His relationship to God (“if you are the son of God”—Matthew 4:3), the temptation to test God presumptuously (“throw yourself down” from the temple—verse 6), and the temptation to gain worldly wealth and power by worshiping Satan (verse 9).

We welcome your reaction to any of the articles or columns in this issue. We reserve the right to edit for grammar, punctuation, and space. All letters to the editor become the property of Signs of the Times®. You can write a letter to the editor and submit it online on the Letters to the Editors page.